Inviska Rename
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About Inviska Rename

Inviska Rename is a batch file rename tool that allows you to give meaningful names to groups of files. It can be used for renaming music files from tags (screenshot), replacing photograph names like DSC04651.JPG with more useful names like "Spain Holiday - 154.jpg" (screenshot), renaming photos from Exif tags (screenshot), and other renaming tasks.

Features

Renames Menu
Save common renames

Inviska Rename can perform the following operations:

Usage Instructions

A basic rename operation can be performed by following the below steps.

  1. Open a directory by pasting the path into the address bar, by going to File -> Open Directory, or by browsing to the directory by double clicking folders in the file list.
  2. Check the boxes next to the rename operations you wish to perform and specify the relevant information.
  3. Check the Preview pane to confirm that the files will be renamed as you intended.
  4. Press the Rename button in the bottom left and then click Yes to perform the rename operation.

We'll now look at some specific case studies to illustrate the steps involved.

Case Study - Renaming Photos

You've been on a holiday to Spain and you want to rename you photos and videos from names like DSC07760.JPG and MOV07647.MP4 to names like "Spain Holiday - 073.jpg" and "Spain Holiday Video - 34.mp4". First let's rename the photos.

  1. Open the directory containing the photos by pasting the path into the address bar, or by going to File -> Open Directory.
  2. Check the Replace Name With box and enter "Spain Holiday - " into the box.
    Replace Name With Spain Holiday -
  3. Under Rename click Files With Extension and enter "JPG" into the box.
    Files With Extension JPG
  4. Click the Extension tab, check the Replace Name With box and enter "jpg" into the box.
    Replace Name With Spain jpg
  5. Click the Numbering tab and click Number After Filename.
    Number After Filename
  6. Click the Rename button and then click Yes.

We'll now rename the videos by following a similar procedure.

  1. Check the Replace Name With box and enter "Spain Holiday Video - " into the box.
  2. Under Rename click Files With Extension and enter "MP4"
  3. Click the Extension tab, check the Replace Name With box and enter "mp4" into the box.
  4. Click the Numbering tab and click Number After Filename.
  5. Click the Rename button and then click Yes.

After performing these operations the files will look like this. Other types of files can be renamed by following a similar procedure.

Case Study - Renaming Music Files Using Tags

You have some mp3 files which have been tagged with the track information, but have been given uninformative filenames like "track01.mp3". You want to give the files more useful names based on the ID3v2 tag information. Here we'll see how to rename the files to the format
"Artist - Album - Track - Title.mp3".

  1. Open the directory containing the music files by pasting the path into the address bar, or by going to File -> Open Directory.
  2. Check the Replace Name With box and enter "[$Mu-Artist] - [$Mu-Album] - [$Mu-Track] - [$Mu-Title]" into the box. Tag information can also be entered through the Tags menu, so you don't have to remember the individual tag codes (see the "Using Tags" section below).
  3. Under Rename click Files With Extension and enter "mp3". This step can be skipped if the folder contains only mp3 files.
  4. Click the Rename button and then click Yes.

This screenshot illustrates the above process. For further details on renaming files with tags, and for a list of all available tags, see the "Using Tags" section below.

Case Study - Ordering Photos From Two Cameras Using Exif Tags

You went on a holiday to Spain and took two different cameras. You want to rename the photos from the two cameras so they appear in the order they were taken. We'll see how to do this below using the Exif data embedded in the photos. This example assumes that the date and time were correctly set on both cameras.

  1. Open the directory containing photos from the first camera by pasting the path into the address bar, or by going to File -> Open Directory.
  2. Check the Replace Name With box and enter "[$Ex-DateTime] A". The 'A' at the end is included to eliminate possible naming conflicts.
  3. Under Rename click Files With Extension and enter "JPG". This step can be skipped if the folder contains only jpg files.
  4. Click the Numbering tab and click Number After Filename. This is again to eliminate the possibility of a naming conflict, since shots taken in burst mode could end up with the same name. Following this step the filenames will appear as shown in this screenshot.
  5. Click the Rename button and then click Yes.
  6. Open the directory containing the photos from the second camera.
  7. Check the Replace Name With box and enter "[$Ex-DateTime] B" (note the 'B' at the end).
  8. Under Rename click Files With Extension and enter "jpg".
  9. Click the Numbering tab and click Number After Filename.
  10. Click the Rename button and then click Yes.

After this you can merge the photos from the two cameras into a single directory and, since they are named with the date and time they were taken, they will appear in the correct order. However, names like "2017-07-25 11;48;45 A054.JPG" aren't very attractive, so we'll finish by renaming the merged photos with a more pleasing and useful name:

  1. Open the directory containing the photos.
  2. Check the Replace Name With box and enter "Spain Holiday - " into the box.
  3. Under Rename click Files With Extension and enter "JPG" into the box.
  4. Click the Extension tab, check the Replace Name With box and enter "jpg" into the box.
  5. Click the Numbering tab and click Number After Filename.
  6. Click the Rename button and then click Yes.

With that we've successfully renamed the photos from the two cameras so that the merged photos will appear in the order the pictures were taken.

Using Tags

Tags Menu
Insert tag codes

Tags allow you to rename files using meta information stored in the files; for example track information in music files or Exif information in digital photographs. Tags codes can be used in the following boxes, in both the name and extension settings:

Tags codes can be entered by clicking in a box at the position you want the code to be inserted, then go to the Tags menu and selecting the tag code you wish to insert. Alternatively you can just type the tag code manually. For easy reference the tag codes are printed in the Tags menu, except on MacOS, which strips them off for reasons unknown. Tag codes are case insensitive, so [$mu-title] and [$MU-TITLE] will both be recognised as [$Mu-Title].

The first time a tag code is entered, Inviska Rename will read all information for that tag type from the files in the directory. For example, if you enter [$Mu-Title] all music tag information will be read so it is in memory and ready for use if you type in another music tag code. In most cases reading the tag information will happen almost instantly, but for directories containing hundreds of files it can take a bit longer. Note that if you change directories, tag information read for the current directory will be discarded and information for the new directory will be read.

Once the tag information is read any tag codes you enter will be replaced with the relevant information in the preview pane. If a file does not contain information for a specific tag code, the code will simply be stripped out and no information will be put in its place.

Music Tag Codes
Tag Code Description
[$Mu-Title] Title of music track.
[$Mu-Artist] Performing artist.
[$Mu-Album] Album from which track originates.
[$Mu-Track] Track number in album.
[$Mu-Year] Year song was produced.
[$Mu-Genre] Genre of music.
[$Mu-Comment] Comment entered by encoder of file.
[$Mu-RunTime] Track length in the format mm;ss.
e.g. a 4min25sec track would insert 04;25.
[$Mu-Channels] Number of channels as a digit.
e.g. a stereo track would insert 2.
[$Mu-SampleRate] Sample rate in Hz with no unit.
e.g. a 44100 Hz rate would insert 44100.
You can add the unit with [$Mu-SampleRate] Hz.
[$Mu-BitRate] Bitrate in kbps with no unit.
e.g. a 320 kbps bitrate would insert 320.
You can add the unit with [$Mu-BitRate] kbps.
Exif Tag Codes
Tag Code Description
[$Ex-CameraMake] Manufacturer of camera.
[$Ex-CameraModel] Model of camera.
[$Ex-FNumber] F-number as a number with no unit.
e.g. f/3.2 bitrate would insert 3.2.
You can add the unit with f-[$Ex-FNumber].
[$Ex-ISOSpeed] ISO speed as a number with no unit.
e.g. ISO 200 would insert 200.
You can add the unit with ISO [$Ex-ISOSpeed].
[$Ex-ExposureTime] Exposure time in seconds as a fraction with no unit.
e.g. a 1/100s exposure time would insert 1|100.
e.g. a 20s exposure time would insert 20.
[$Ex-ExposureTimeDec] Exposure time in seconds as a decimal with no unit.
e.g. a 1/320s exposure time would insert 0.003125.
e.g. a 20s exposure time would insert 20.
[$Ex-FocalLength] Focal length in mm with no unit.
e.g. a 50mm focal length would insert 50.
You can add the unit with [$Ex-FocalLength]mm.
[$Ex-Program] Program used to take the photo.
e.g. Example modes are Normal, Landscape, Portrait.
[$Ex-PixelDimX] Horizontal image resolution in pixels.
e.g. a 5152x2896 image would insert 5152.
[$Ex-PixelDimY] Vertical image resolution in pixels.
e.g. a 5152x2896 image would insert 2896.
[$Ex-DateTime] Date and time the picture was taken in the format
YYYY-MM-DD HH;MM;SS e.g. 1999-12-31 23;59;59.
[$Ex-Date] Date the picture was taken in the format
YYYY-MM-DD e.g. 1999-12-31.
[$Ex-Time] Time the picture was taken in the format
HH;MM;SS e.g. 23;59;59.
[$Ex-DateYYYY] Four digit year the picture was taken, e.g. 1999.
Can be used to make your own date format, e.g US format:
[$Ex-DateMM]-[$Ex-DateDD]-[$Ex-DateYYYY] = 12-31-1999.
[$Ex-DateYY] Two digit year the picture was taken, e.g. 99.
Can be used to make your own date format, e.g US format:
[$Ex-DateMM]-[$Ex-DateDD]-[$Ex-DateYY] = 12-31-99.
[$Ex-DateMM] Two digit month the picture was taken, e.g. 12.
Can be used to make your own date format, e.g US format:
[$Ex-DateMM]-[$Ex-DateDD]-[$Ex-DateYYYY] = 12-31-1999.
[$Ex-DateDD] Two digit day the picture was taken, e.g. 31.
Can be used to make your own date format, e.g US format:
[$Ex-DateMM]-[$Ex-DateDD]-[$Ex-DateYYYY] = 12-31-1999.
[$Ex-TimeHH] Two digit hour the picture was taken, e.g. 23.
Can be used to make your own time format:
[$Ex-TimeHH].[$Ex-TimeMM].[$Ex-TimeSS] = 23.59.59.
[$Ex-TimeMM] Two digit minute the picture was taken, e.g. 59.
Can be used to make your own time format:
[$Ex-TimeHH].[$Ex-TimeMM].[$Ex-TimeSS] = 23.59.59.
[$Ex-TimeSS] Two digit second the picture was taken, e.g. 59.
Can be used to make your own time format:
[$Ex-TimeHH].[$Ex-TimeMM].[$Ex-TimeSS] = 23.59.59.
File Attribute Tag Codes
Tag Code Description
[$At-CreatedDateTime] Date and time the file was created [1] in the format
YYYY-MM-DD HH;MM;SS e.g. 1999-12-31 23;59;59.
[$At-CreatedDate] Date the file was created [1] in the format
YYYY-MM-DD e.g. 1999-12-31.
[$At-CreatedTime] Time the file was created [1] in the format
HH;MM;SS e.g. 23;59;59.
[$At-CreatedDateYYYY] Four digit year the file was created [1], e.g. 1999.
[$At-CreatedDateYY] Two digit year the file was created [1], e.g. 99.
[$At-CreatedDateMM] Two digit month the file was created [1], e.g. 12.
[$At-CreatedDateDD] Two digit day the file was created [1], e.g. 31.
[$At-CreatedTimeHH] Two digit hour the file was created [1], e.g. 23.
[$At-CreatedTimeMM] Two digit minute the file was created [1], e.g. 59.
[$At-CreatedTimeSS] Two digit second the file was created [1], e.g. 59.
[$At-ModifiedDateTime] Date and time the file was modified in the format
YYYY-MM-DD HH;MM;SS e.g. 1999-12-31 23;59;59.
[$At-ModifiedDate] Date the file was modified in the format
YYYY-MM-DD e.g. 1999-12-31.
[$At-ModifiedTime] Time the file was modified in the format
HH;MM;SS e.g. 23;59;59.
[$At-ModifiedDateYYYY] Four digit year the file was modified, e.g. 1999.
[$At-ModifiedDateYY] Two digit year the file was modified, e.g. 99.
[$At-ModifiedDateMM] Two digit month the file was modified, e.g. 12.
[$At-ModifiedDateDD] Two digit day the file was modified, e.g. 31.
[$At-ModifiedTimeHH] Two digit hour the file was modified, e.g. 23.
[$At-ModifiedTimeMM] Two digit minute the file was modified, e.g. 59.
[$At-ModifiedTimeSS] Two digit second the file was modified, e.g. 59.

[1] - The "Created" date refers to the date the file was created on the disk it currently resides, and can therefore differ from the date the file was originally created. If you make a copy of a file, the "Created" date of the copy will be set to the date you made the copy, rather than the date the original file was created. For example, if we look at the file properties for a photograph that currently resides on an SD card, we can see the file was created on 22 March 2016. However, if we copy that file from the SD card to the computer, then look at the file properties of the copy, we can see it says it was created on 31 July 2017, which is the date the copy was made. For this reason, it can often be the case that the "Created" date does not contain the information you want, but in some situations the "Modified" date can be used instead. The "Modified" date stores the date the file was last modified (e.g. edited and saved). If the file has not been modified since it was created the "Modified" date will store the date the file was originally created. For example, if we look again at the file properties for the copy of the photo we can see that, although the "Created" data has changed to 31 July 2017, the "Modified" date is still 22 March 2016, which is the date the original file was created. As we can see then, if you want to rename the file with the date it was originally created, it may sometimes be better to use the [$At-ModifiedDateTime] data rather than the [$At-CreatedDateTime] date.

If you require further assistance, or wish to report a bug, please visit the forum or see the FAQ.